Trevor Msibi

PhD candidate, National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, University of Southern Queensland

Trevor Msibi

PhD candidate, National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, University of Southern Queensland

Sandile Trevor Msibi is a PhD candidate in the School of Civil Engineering and Surveying at the University of Southern Queensland. He is specializing in Irrigation Engineering with a research focus on the modelling of hydraulic transients and pressure regulation of variable-rate irrigation using large mobile sprinkler systems. This involves the application of advanced hydraulic engineering modelling techniques such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other transient flow and water hammer simulation models in the characterization of transient pressure waves and their impact on the hydraulic performance of mechanized irrigation systems. Msibi’s research interests also include optimizing design and management of pressurized systems, energy efficiency improvement, flow measurement and water management. He holds a BSc in Land & Water Management from the University of Swaziland and an MSc in Irrigation Engineering from Sokoine University in Tanzania.

Where: International Convention Centre, Sydney – Room E5.2 – E5.3

When: Day 2 – Thursday, 14 June 2018, 11.00 – 11.30

Abstract Outline: Variable-rate irrigation (VRI) technology enables centre pivot and lateral move irrigation machines to spatially vary irrigation depths to meet specific water requirements of discrete management zones. The process of retrofitting the VRI into these machines is principally governed by field variability, and no attempt is made to account for the hydraulic characteristics of the VRI equipment. This study was conducted to determine the hydraulic characteristics of VRI valves to establish the amount of minor pressure head loss through the devices, the effects of this minor head loss on the minimum design pressure required for pressure regulation, the potential additional energy requirements, and the pressure regulating characteristics of VRI machines. Results show that the head loss is about 6 psi, with a pressure head greater than 10 psi required for pressure regulated VRI systems.

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