Wednesday 13 – Friday 15 June 2018 | International Convention Centre, Sydney

Richard Vines

Specialist: Knowledge Management, DEDJTR / Agribio

Richard Vines

Specialist: Knowledge Management, DEDJTR / Agribio

Richard joined Agriculture Victoria as a specialist as part of a start-up knowledge management initiative in December 2010. In 2015 he received a DEDJTR Achievement Award for “Developing the eXtension project: transforming the connection of people and knowledge”. This was based on his role in an international collaboration that included representatives from across the US Land Grant network of Universities and the Grains Research and Development Corporation. He was also joint recipient of a 2016 Mander Jones Award for the best article about archives written by an Australian in an archives, library, museum or records management journal [Cultivating Capability: The Socio-Technical Challenges of Integrating Approaches to Records and Knowledge Management]. Richard is a graduate in Forest Science (University of Melbourne) and Honorary Fellow at the eScholarship Research Centre at the same university. The eSRC is research centre with a global reputation in the practical application of social and cultural informatics.

Where: International Convention Centre, Sydney – Room E5.7

When: Day 2 – Thursday, 14 June 2018, 8.30 – 9.00

Abstract Outline: This presentation will provide a strategic assessment of what new capabilities need to be considered when proposing resource allocation decision support systems that rely upon water policy models. A case study related to an instrument called the “Northern Victorian Water Policy Model” (NVWPM) will be presented. This model draws upon the development of a range of software applications undertaken by Agriculture Victoria going back to the early 2000s. More recently modelling has been extended to explore the economic implications of water allocations across a wide range of different land use types in Northern Victoria.

In unpacking one particular methodology used to digitally represent the knowledge ecology of the NVWPM, the concept of a “public knowledge space” will by hypothesised. Details of what is meant by “space”, “knowledge space” and “public knowledge space” will all be discussed. In so doing, several important functions of these different spaces will be proposed. It will be concluded that more attention needs to be paid to the capabilities required to digitally represent and model different knowledge spaces if the full benefits of instruments such as the NVWPM are to be realised in a wide range of local, social, cultural and commercial decision-contexts.

© Irrigation Australia Exhibition & Conference | Organised by Exhibitions and Trade Fairs | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use