Dr Amjed Hussain

Research Scientist (Irrigation Hydrology), Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources

Dr Amjed Hussain

Research Scientist (Irrigation Hydrology), Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources

Amjed Hussain is working as Research Scientist (Irrigation hydrology) in the Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and resources, Victoria Australia. He has previously been involved with the research investigating the sustainable use of surface and groundwater resources and improving crop water use efficiency.  He has also undertaken subsurface drip irrigation, soil salinity and on-farm water channel performance research.  He received his PhD from the University of Southern Queensland. Currently he is working on two projects that aim to improve the efficiency of border-check irrigation bays.

Where: International Convention Centre, Sydney – Room E5.10

When: Day 3 – Friday, 15 June 2018, 9.00 – 9.30

Abstract Outline: This study combines local weather data with satellite imagery to provide customised, web-based crop and location specific measures of reference evapotranspiration and crop coefficient for use in irrigation scheduling. A bay-scale field experiment was conducted on a relatively low permeability soil (Lemnos loam) on a dairy farm near Kyabram, Victoria. The experimental bay supported an established perennial pasture irrigated by pipe and riser, a pressurised irrigation system. The date of next irrigation was predicted for a nominal operational soil water deficit of approximately 50 mm. A simple volume balance method was used to calculate the inflow duration of all irrigation events. Inflow and runoff were measured on four irrigations to assess hydrologic performance. Irrigation application depths ranged between 45 and 51 mm, at intervals between 11-22 days. Runoff occurred in all irrigations (range, 2.5 – 9.3 mm), and accounted for 10% of water applied when aggregated over the four events. Despite the uncertainty inherent in the estimates of crop water requirement and in the measurement of inflow and runoff, results suggest that the system has the potential to manage irrigation automation for low permeable dairy soils in northern Victoria.

© Irrigation Australia International Exhibition & Conference | Organised by Exhibitions and Trade Fairs | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use